Havanablast Kennels
Exhibitors and Breeders of Quality Havanese Dogs
 
Last Updated October 11, 2015
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Research/Breeding

Basic rules and recommendations for breeding healthy happy fit for function dogs. 1.The breeding programme should not exclude more than 50% of the breed; the breeding stock must be selected from the best half of the population.

2.Only functionally, clinically healthy dogs should be used for breeding; dogs with chronic diseases should never be bred unless we know for sure that heritability plays no role in causing the disease. If a dog suffers from a disease that is suspected, but not proven, to be inherited, the dog should not be used for breeding. If close relatives of such a dog are used for breeding, they should be mated to dogs from bloodlines with low or no occurrence of the same disease.

3. Avoid matador breeding. A basic recommendation should be that no dog should have more offspring than equivalent to 5% of the number of puppies registered in the breed during a five year period.

4. A bitch that is unable to have normal birth, due to anatomy or inherited inertia, should be excluded from breeding – no matter the breed.

5. A bitch that is unable to take care of the newborn puppies, due to mentality or inherited to agalactia, should not be used for breeding.

6. Dogs with a mentality atypical for the breed, aggressive dogs, should not be used for breeding.

7. Screening results for polygenetic diseases should be used for preparation of an individual index, based on both national and international screening results. The breeding combination should have an index better than the average for the breed.

8. Results from DNA tests should be used to avoid breeding diseased dogs, not necessarily to eradicate the disease.

9. The raising of puppies, with correct feeding, environmental exposure, stimulation by their mother, breeder and others to develop social sense and response, must be basic in every breeding.

If these simple basic rules and recommendations are implied in a breeding programme, we would attain considerable improvement of dogs’ health. Breed specific health issues should be added in order to make an even greater improvement of the health.

If we continue to allow breeders to mate because they can ALL breeds will suffer severe health problems. Breeders must learn to recognise the reality of why they are breeding and in most cases it is NOT for breed betterment but salary.